A stoic quote by Epictetus from Discourses I, 12.26-27

You ought to realize, you take up very little space in the world as a whole – your body, that is; in reason, however, you yield to no one, not even to the gods, because reason is not measured in size but sense. So why not care for that side of you, where you and the gods are equals? ― Epictetus Discourses I, 12.26-27

A stoic quote by Epictetus from Discourses I, 13.4

If you have been placed in a position above others, are you automatically going to behave like a despot? Remember who you are and whom you govern – that they are kinsmen, brothers by nature, fellow descendants of Zeus. ― Epictetus Discourses I, 13.4

A stoic quote by Epictetus from Discourses I, 17.6

Which, I suppose, is why Stoics put logic at the head of our curriculum – for the same reason that, before a quantity of grain can be measured, we must settle on a standard of measurement. ― Epictetus Discourses I, 17.6

A stoic quote by Epictetus from Discourses I, 18.18-19

We should discipline ourselves in small things, and from there progress to things of greater value. If you have a headache, practise not cursing. Don’t curse every time you have an earache. And I’m not saying that you can’t complain, only don’t complain with your whole being. ― Epictetus Discourses I, 18.18-19

A stoic quote by Epictetus from Discourses I, 20.12

If you want to know just how little concerned you are about things good and bad, and how serious about things indifferent, compare your attitude to going blind with your attitude about being mentally in the dark. You will realize, I think, how inappropriate your values really are. ― Epictetus Discourses I, 20.12

A stoic quote by Epictetus from Discourses I, 24.1-2

The true man is revealed in difficult times. So when trouble comes, think of yourself as a wrestler whom God, like a trainer, has paired with a tough young buck. For what purpose? To turn you into Olympic-class material. But this is going to take some sweat to accomplish. ― Epictetus Discourses I, 24.1-2

A stoic quote by Epictetus from Discourses I, 25.28-29

Remember that it is we who torment, we who make difficulties for ourselves – that is, our opinions do. What, for instance, does it mean to be insulted? Stand by a rock and insult it, and what have you accomplished? If someone responds to insult like a rock, what has the abuser gained with his invective? ― Epictetus Discourses I, 25.28-29