A stoic quote by Epictetus from Discourses I, 7.5

For what does reason purport to do? “Establish what is true, eliminate what is false and suspend judgement in doubtful cases.” ... What else does reason prescribe? “To accept the consequence of what has been admitted to be correct.” ― Epictetus Discourses I, 7.5

A stoic quote by Epictetus from Discourses II, 12.24-25

At this point you run the risk of him saying, ‘What business is that of yours, sir? What are you to me?’ Pester him further, and he is liable to punch you in the nose. I myself was once keen for this sort of discourse, until I met with just such a reception. ― Epictetus Discourses II, 12.24-25

A stoic quote by Epictetus from Discourses II, 20.1

Even people who deny that statements can be valid or impressions clear are obliged to make use of both. You might almost say that nothing proves the validity of a statement more than finding someone forced to use it while at the same time denying that it is sound. ― Epictetus Discourses II, 20.1

A stoic quote by Epictetus from Discourses II, 21.16

Don’t be disappointed if you return home with the very same set of ideas you arrived with. Because you had no intention of changing, correcting or adopting others in their place. ― Epictetus Discourses II, 21.16

A stoic quote by Epictetus from Discourses II, 21.20

You say the speculative topics are useless. Useless to whom? Only to people who don’t use them as they should. I mean, salves and ointments are not useless to people who apply them when and how they’re supposed to; weights are not useless in themselves, they’re useful to some people, worthless to others. ― Epictetus Discourses II, 21.20

A stoic quote by Epictetus from Discourses II, 22.26-27

Just ask whether they put their self-interest in externals or in moral choice. If it’s in externals, you cannot call them friends, any more than you can call them trustworthy, consistent, courageous or free. ― Epictetus Discourses II, 22.26-27

A stoic quote by Epictetus from Discourses II, 22.36

[Treat] unenlightened souls with sympathy and indulgence, remembering that they are ignorant or mistaken about what’s most important. Never be harsh, remember Plato’s dictum: ‘Every soul is deprived of the truth against its will.’ ― Epictetus Discourses II, 22.36